Nevada State Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners

Posted January 8, 2013.

The best time to prevent a Nevada State Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners complaint is long before the incident or adverse treatment outcome occurs that leads to the complaint. By joining the VDA early, you will have time to assimilate the new information and to put the VDA’s battery of risk prevention measures into place in your practice. This will help you to reduce the risks inherent in miscommunications and disputes with owners and will reduce the risk associated with adverse treatment outcomes and failure to meet owner expectations. Smart, organized veterinarians have happier clients and experience fewer veterinary board complaints.

The best time to start to manage a VMB complaint is at the time that the incident or adverse treatment occurs. VDA members provide VDA Consultants with details of the event, together with patient charts, consent to treatment forms, logs, radiographs, lab results etc depending on what is relevant in each case. VDA Consultants are experienced veterinarians specially trained in veterinary medical defence by the VDA. The VDA then provides the member with advice and guidance on the treatment, documentation and management of the case to date, together with advice and guidance on how to manage the case from that point forward. This will include advice on how to communicate with the client, what to do when treatment was not successful or in the case of the death of the animal. The VDA’s advice and guidance is focused on dealing with the owner’s concerns and grievances, preventing the matter from escalating into a board complaint or civil malpractice lawsuit and what measures the member should take in future to reduce or prevent the recurrence of such incidents, including remedying any deficiencies in treatment. In most cases, the member has met the minimum required standards of conduct and good communication and management prevents the owner resorting to a veterinary board complaint.

If an owner is still dissatisfied, the VDA enters into alternate dispute resolution directly with the owner, in which the VDA engages with the owner and explains the medical and factual issues concerning the case. If a member has not reached minimum required standards of practice, then the VDA uses this process to negotiate a full and final settlement with the owner. ADR is highly successful in most cases. 
For the few owners that still remain dissatisfied for any reason, there are two avenues open to them. When the market value of the animal is low, most will take the route of a lodging a veterinary board complaint. When the market value is higher, or if the owner has a cause of action to sue for emotional damages, the owner may choose to sue for malpractice in a civil court, or may choose to test the merits of their case with a veterinary board complaint, followed by civil court action.

For the veterinarian, board disciplinary proceedings commence with a letter from the board, informing you of the complaint and usually demanding your response, copies of records etc. If you have been following the VDA’s advice and guidance, you will be in strong position at this stage. The VDA will advise you of your rights to fair administrative action and due process; will guide you through the process and will prepare all correspondence and responses on your behalf. The VDA’s appointed lawyers, who are leading medical litigation defense specialists and form part of the VDA’s defense team, will represent you at board hearings and administrative trials.

The VDA’s risk prevention and management programs will place you in the best position to prevent board complaints and to defend your license, professional integrity and right to practice your profession.

You may contact the VDA at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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DISCLAIMER: The content of this site is for information, discussion and debate purposes only, in the interest of openness and transparency. The content may not be used or disseminated in any form or manner without the written permission of the VDA. The VDA, its directors, staff, members and agents will not be responsible or liable in any respect for any harm or damages of any nature whatsoever arising directly or indirectly from any omission or action taken based on or in any way related to the information contained in this website without the involvement and written acknowledgement of the VDA.

 
Veterinary Surgeon's Board of Queensland

Posted January 7, 2013.

Information to follow shortly.

You may contact the VDA at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

VDA Copyright reserved. 
DISCLAIMER: The content of this site is for information, discussion and debate purposes only, in the interest of openness and transparency. The content may not be used or disseminated in any form or manner without the written permission of the VDA. The VDA, its directors, staff, members and agents will not be responsible or liable in any respect for any harm or damages of any nature whatsoever arising directly or indirectly from any omission or action taken based on or in any way related to the information contained in this website without the involvement and written acknowledgement of the VDA.